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Baltic Crusades: Converting Pagan Forces

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Prince Nyklot the Abodrite prince, had lost southern lands along the western frontier, attacked Wagria, the lands of Adolph II in the June of 1147.  The region fell to Wendish forces, and German villages came under attack.

Late summer of 1147, two Danish fleets, two Saxon armies, attacked the Wends.  Danes attacked northern shores.  Duke Henry the Lion of Saxony attacked Nyklot’s outpost at Dobin.

Nyklot had chosen wisely to make his stand at Dobin, the only ground surrounded by marshland and lake.  Nyklot sailed from Dobin, mauled the Danes, cutting off Danish and Saxon forces as the Wendish fleet attacked the Danish shipping in their northern harbours.

Two Danish Kings; Canute V and Sweyn III fed up with combined defeats, blamed each other for their losses, returned to Denmark and their Civil-War.  Whilst, Henry the Lion and Archbishop Adelbero laid siege to Dobin.  Battle weary and starving Wends, had no option but be baptized in the Christian faith.

Southern armies of Conrad, Albert the Bear and other forces began falling apart.  They should have attacked the Wends, but marched upon the Christian city of Stettin, and laid siege to the town… They left empty handed as religious leaders won in a parley.  For the city met within the Pope’s requirements.

The first year of the Baltic Crusade was more show than conquest.  Pagan shrines and idols were left intact.  Wends returned home, once Saxon banners were out of sight.  Saxon, Danes and Poles united through the church, but didn’t take long to fall apart.  The Saxons believed the Danes were weak, and an alliance would not work.  Strong and weak forces, would not mix well.

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