Knights Templar: Balantrodoch Preceptory

The Templars had a large number of estates in Scotland, and the 1185 inventory of Templar properties only applied to England, and the inventory which should have taken place after their arrest, never took place in Scotland.  In 1312, the Pope decreed the suppression of the Templars, but King Edward II locked in conflict with Scotland had no intention of enforcing it.

In 1153 King David I of Scotland (1124-1153), granted the knights Templar a parcel of land, to the south of Edinburgh.  Here upon this site, the Order of the Knights Templar established a Preceptory at, and so was born; Temple Church, Temple Mid-Lothian.  This Preceptory became the greatest centre of the Templars in Scotland, where upon they administered their Scottish sites, for the lifetime of the Order, across Scotland.

A gift from a Scottish King carried much weight, as others followed in his footsteps in granting them lands.

King Malcolm IV of Scotland (1153-1165) donated a complete homestead within every burgh throughout his kingdom of Scotland.

William the Lion (1165-1214) gave to the Knights Templar, the barony of Maryculter which comprised of 8,000 acres.

It is said Alexander I – II & III along with Robert I & II, James I – III & IV went on to increase Templar Estates from the Royal Exchequer.

Members of Scotland’s nobility, bestowed gifts upon the “Order” which included much lands.

With the Order of the Knights Templar suppressed in 1312, Templars were outlawed, and their lands and buildings were supposed to pass into Hospitalliers hands, whose Scottish seat was at Torphichen in West Lothian.  The Pope’s orders were seldom followed, as was the case here.

The old Templar Church continued to serve the people of the parish for many centuries, until it fell into ruin in the 19th century.

The ruined church is located to the west of the village, in the South Esk valley, which runs alongside the River Esk.  It is believed the church dates back to early 14th century, and still standing within, one can find late gothic tracery, with animal carvings at the end of the mouldings, located above the old windows.

The original church had a round nave, like many Templar churches, a look alike of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.  The church roof has long since gone… with some walls still remaining.  The west end was the entrance to the church, with the altar at the east end.  Surprisingly the carved piscina had survived, with old niches carved into the walls, where once would have housed tombs, but these are long gone now. 

Gravestones in the old graveyard bearing the symbols of carved skull and crossbones, one associated with death and the Knights Templar.  Masonic symbols can be found; the trowel denotes the symbol of a builder.  An egg timer = the passing of time, plus the classic compass and set square.

Village Headstone: John Craig Outerston, a farmer who died in 1742 is shown wearing Sunday best clothes with his children.

A solitary preceptory arch stands in a field to the eastern part of the village, once the main entrance to a former   stands Templars Manor House.

One event which involved William a preceptor and Templar of Ballentrodoch and his wife Christiane of Esperston.

William gifted the family home to the Templar Order in return for renting the said property, thus creating a life without financial hardships.

William suddenly died, his wife Christiane was penniless, and now the family home belonged to the Templar Order.  Which led to a Templar preceptor casting poor Christiane and her children from the former family home.  As she clutched at the door, her fingers were cut off by a sword at the hands of a Templar.

A distraught and homeless Christiane went to Newbattle Abbey where Edward I was staying and pleaded her case to him, and he so ordered her property be returned to her.  Not long after, war broke out and she found herself evicted once again. Richard her son, pleaded her case to Brian de Jay of the Templar Order.  Her property was once again returned to her, in return for her son acting as a guide for Welsh troops under the command of Brian de Jay.  It was nothing more than a trap, for Richard was murdered by Welsh troops by order of Brian de Jay.

At the Templar Trials, Brian de Jay was accused of acts of heresy, even though he could not answer the charges, having been killed at the ‘Battle of Falkirk.’  One Thomas Tocci de Thoroldeby claimed he had referred to Christ as being a mere man, and not a God.

Local legends has it that some of the Templar Treasure from Paris made its way to Scotland, and was hidden by Templar Knights at Balantrodoch.

The saying goes: “Twixt the oak and the elm tree.  You will find buried the millions free.”

Wikipedia Images:
Balantrodoch Chapel
Preceptory Arch

Sources:
In Search of the Knights Templar by Simon Brighton.

Knights Templar and the Scottish Sanctuary

Scotland had always been an important location for the Order of the Knights Templar.  The political landscape in Scotland at that time, made it a particularly suitable sanctuary, following the attack against the Templars by King Philip Of France and the Pope.

With the death of King Alexander III of Scotland in 1286, the ancient line of Celtic kings came to an abrupt end.  For there was no brother, sister or children, and his only heir was Margaret: The Maid of Norway, who died on route to Scotland, leaving Scotland with no King or Queen.

The land of Scotland lay in dispute by possible successors, each prepared to take up arms and fight for Scotland’s crown.  The infighting continued, until it was agreed to ask for help from King Edward I of England in choosing Scotland’s new king and ruler.

However, King Edward I had other ideas, he took advantage of the situation by lending support to John de Balliol, one of the contenders for the Scottish throne and kingdom.  In return Edward demanded of Balliol his support, thus he became a vassal of the English King and paid homage for his Scottish Kingdom.  The Scots were not fooled, and he was unpopular and gained the title “Toom Tabard.”  The translated version being “Empty Gown” for he had become the puppet of King Edward I.  Edward had no respect for Balliol, and often publicly humiliated him.

In 1296, John de Balliol refused King Edward’s call for Scottish warriors to fight side by side with English forces against France.  Edward responded the only way he knew, by marching on Berwick, deposing Balliol and exiled him to France.

So, it came to pass, King Edward I of England claimed direct rule over Scotland, without the spilling of any English blood.

Edward ordered that the “Stone of Scone,” a symbol of Scotland’s Independence, that which Scottish Kings were crowned upon was moved to Westminster Abbey.

In the May of 1297, William Wallace killed the Sheriff of Lanark, for the murder of his wife.  This was an affront to the English King; Edward I and punishment was demanded.

William Wallace received much support from rebel Scottish forces, leading to the Battle of Stirling Bridge on the 11th September 1297, where battle hardened English forces were defeated by the Scots.

Edward made peace with the French, leaving him free to sort out William Wallace, whom he defeated at the Battle of Linlithgow in 1298.  Wallace evaded capture and fled to France seeking military support from Edward’s old enemies.  King Philip the Fair, commended Wallace in his cause, in letters sent to Pope Clement V, and support came from the Moray family, they who were linked to Templars and Freemasons.  In 1303 Scots and English clashed at Roslin, which led to Scottish victory thanks to the Templar Knights led by a St.Clair.  William Wallace an outlaw against the English crown created hell for seven years before being betrayed by one of his own.  He was arrested, found guilty, hung, drawn and quartered in London of 1305.  Wallace’s body parts were hung in; Newcastle -On-Tyne, Berwick, Sterling and Perth.

Only two Scots had an undisputable claim upon the Scottish throne; Robert the Bruce the 8th Earl of Carrick and John Comyn.  Robert worked with Edward I, but it wasn’t long before John Comyn informed Edward, that Robert the Bruce was scheming against him.  News reached Robert, that his life was in danger, forcing him to take direct action.

With John Comyn a favourite of the Pope and Edward I, he rose the Battle Standard for the growing Celtic revival which existed in his own ranks.  It was a calculated gamble.  Comyn had been lured to Dumfries Franciscan church, and Robert attacked him on the altar steps and Robert refused aid to a dying man.  Edward and the Pope condemned such an act on holy ground, and Scottish patriots read it as a defiance of the English.  On the 10th February 1305 Robert the Bruce was excommunicated by the Pope.  In 1306 Robert the Bruce was crowned King of Scotland by Countess Buchan at Scone.

King Edward I of England died in 1307 and succeeded by his weak and homosexual son Edward II and crowned on the 28th February 1308.  King Philip sprung his trap on the 13th October 1307, arresting Templars across France and seizing their treasures.  He had been foiled, much of the Templar treasure had disappeared, as a Templar fleet slipped anchor the previous night laden with treasures.

Part of the Templar fleet is said to have headed to Argyll and the Firth of Forth in Scotland, where they sought sanctuary.

In March of 1314, Jacques de Molay last Grand Master of the Knights Templar and Geoffrey de Charney were burned at the stake in Paris.

On the 6th November 1314, the Scots greatest victory over the English took place at the “Battle of Bannockburn.”  English forces were over powering the Scots until the intervention of warriors carrying the battle flag of the Templars, ensuring victory for the Scots, led by Sir William St.Clair, Grand Master of the Scottish Templars.

This great victory was the stepping stone to Scotland’s Independence.  For the next fourteen years the Scots fought the English, when in 1328 England formally recognised Scotland as a free nation… Scotland had gained their Independence, and much blood had been spilt.

These Templars who had fled France had been granted sanctuary in Scotland.  This land whose king, Robert the Bruce had been excommunicated by the Pope, had turned Scotland into pagan lands, thus any Christian ruler could mount a crusade against these heathens.  In 1317 Pope John XXII tried to impose a truce between the English and Scots, Robert the Bruce responded by capturing Berwick.  Papal Scottish relations reached an all-time low, when the English lied to the papal court, by claiming Scottish forces were attacking English forces.  In 1320, the Popes response was to send two papal legates to serve further notices of excommunication against Robert the Bruce.  On the 6th April 1320, the Declaration of Arbroath was published by Scottish Barons in reply to these charges.

Based on the words written in the Declaration of Arbroath, the senior Lords of Scotland were Templars.  They would act more like a president than a king.  One of the Templars who signed this document, was one Lord Henry St.Clair of Rosslyn.

An interesting thought, some hundred years before the signing of the Declaration of Arbroath, the Magna Carta was signed by King John under persuasion by a group of armed lords which included Templar Knights.  To this day, it be the only document of the English constitution that can be compared with the Bill of Rights of the United States, that which was inspired by the Masons.

In the October of 1328, Pope John XXII released Robert the Bruce from a ban of excommunication, and on the 3rd June 1329, aged fifty-five; Robert died.  Robert was succeeded by his son King David II aged five, and Lord Randolph of the Moray family was appointed as Regent until the boy came of age.  Before Robert the Bruce died, he had vowed to return to Jerusalem and fight the mighty Saracen, and as a mark of respect, his embalmed heart was taken by Sir William de St.Clair and Sir James Douglas on a final crusade to Jerusalem, they lost their lives on route at the Battle of Andalusia.  Bruce’s heart failed to reach the city of Jerusalem, and was returned for burial at Melrose Abbey.  Sir William de St.Clair was buried at Rosslyn.

Once Scotland was recognised as part of Christendom, the Templar’s chose to disappear from sight, becoming a member of the secret society, now that the Vatican had the power to prosecute its enemies.

A new secret Order of the Templars was created.  So it was, by the time Scotland had reached agreement to pay homage to the Pope, Templars of Scotland had become invisible.  Of course they still existed if you knew where to seek them out… one place being the St.Clair family.

The Lord Protector and Rosslyn Chapel

According to the writings of Reverend Dyer, Oliver Cromwell, the Lord Protector of England reigned (1653-1658).  It is said he would roam the lands of England, with his Parliamentary army, during the English Civil War (1642-1649) causing much damage to papist churches.  Yet when he came across Rosslyn Chapel, not so much as a scratch was laid upon this building.  It is said Oliver Cromwell was a senior Freemason of high standard, and Rosslyn Chapel was a Masonic Shrine.

In 1650, General Monk’s forces utterly destroyed Rosslyn Castle, and yet again Rosslyn Chapel was left untouched.  Had the chapel been viewed as Catholic, it would surely have been destroyed, as it was Rosslyn Chapel was a shrine.

Numerous Masonic graves can be found in the graveyard, many sporting the symbol (pick and shovel) of the Royal Arch Degree, and the (skull and crossbones), the Templar symbol of resurrection.

William Saint Clair

The Saint Clairs of Roslin, often spelt Rosslyn held a connection which lasted for some 300 years, with the Freemasons of Scotland.

King James II

In 1441, King James II appointed William Saint Clair, Earl of Orkney and Caithness, as Patron and Protector of Scotland’s Freemasons, an office which became hereditary one for the family.  With the death of William Saint Clair in 1484, the office of hereditary patron, was passed down to his descendants.

Rosslyn Chapel

In the year 1446, a founding charter was received from Rome, allowing for the construction of Rosslyn Chapel: Collegiate Church of St. Mathew, the family church of the St.Clairs.

William St.Clair spent four years exploring French Cathedrals and their gothic design, for the design of Rosslyn Chapel.  Then he invited skilled stonemasons from across Europe to come to Scotland, and build the chapel dedicated to the Knights Templar.

According to Scottish tradition, its kings exercised the right in nominating office-bearers to the Freemasons craft.  Only one king neglected to carry out the orders.  First, he be King James VI of Scotland (1567-1603) and carried out his duties, and then as King James I of England (1603-1625), during which time he omitted to carry out his duties.

William St.Clair died in 1484, the office of hereditary Patron was passed down through the family timeline, to the next living descendant.

Around 1600, Freemasons found they were without Protector, and duly appointed William Saint Clair of Roslin, who presided over the order until 1630 when he went to Ireland.  A charter was issued, granting his son Sir William Saint Clair to take over his position in Scotland, and signed off by Masters and Wardens of Scottish Lodges.  Over the next hundred years, the craft continued to flourish, in terms agreed between the Laird of Roslin and Freemasons of Scotland.

The year was 1736 and William Saint Clair to whom the Hereditary Protectorship had descended by right of succession, had no children, and feared the Office of Grand Master, should not become vacant upon his death. 

Accordingly, thirty-two representatives from Edinburgh Lodges assembled, on the 30th November 1736, where their current leader, resigned his post, making way for the election of a new Grand Master.  William Saint Clair was chosen as the new Grand Master in 1737, the last in the line of that noble family, who held the post until January 1778 when he died aged seventy-eight.

The Grand Lodge of Scotland, paid their respects on the announcement of his death, convening a funeral lodge: Four hundred brethren paid tribute to the great man.

Templar Survival

French Templar

By order of the Vatican, Templar Assets were passed to the Hospitalliers around 1312.

One wonders what happened to Templars who avoided capture and persecution.  Some were said to join the Knights of Malta.  Large numbers were said to have joined the “Order of the Holy Sepulchre under Vatican rule.  Others joined the “Order of the Teutonic Knights” and the “Franciscan Order.  Whilst others sought refuge in Scotland, offering their sword to Robert the Bruce, in his battle with the English to achieve Independence for Scotland.

King James II of Spain negotiated with the Pope and Vatican, that the Dynastic Order of Montesa be permitted to take over some of the Templar assets in 1317.

Portugal’s Knights Templar were found not guilty of their charges, and changed their name to the “Knights of Christ” and permitted to retain their assets.  Later they would merge with the Spanish Crown dynastic Order.

12th century Knights Templar of Portugal, played their part to create the Rosicrucian Order around 1407.  The Portuguese Templar Headquarters – Convent of the “Order of Christ,” features three artefact’s; a rose positioned central on a cross within an initiation room dated 1530.  This provides evidence that Templars joined the Rosicrucian’s.

From 1804 orders were initiated by Napoleon Bonaparte I, with zero links to the Templar Order. Archaeological inspiration was received from Egyptian expeditions with links to documents held in the Vatican’s Secret Archives.  Using military force, stole copy of the Chinon Parchment which would vindicate the “Order of the Knights Templar.”

Hereditary and cultural Templars independently continued to influence the development of Europe, evidence by Templar advancement in Switzerland and Scotland.  The Knights Templar had successfully survived as an underground network, for centuries and through to the present day.

Knights Templar: Balantrodoch

600

There is little doubt that the Templars had a large number of estates in Scotland. The 1185 inventory of Templar properties only applied to England, and an inventory which took place after their arrest, never took place in Scotland.  In 1312, the Pope decreed the suppression of the Templars, but King Edward II locked in conflict with Scotland had no intention of enforcing it.

King David I of Scotland (1124-1153), granted the manor and chapel of Balantrodoch to the Order of the Knights Templar in 1153, which became their headquarters on the outskirts of Edinburgh.

King Malcolm IV of Scotland (1153-1165) donated a complete homestead within every burgh throughout his kingdom of Scotland.

William the Lion (1165-1214) gave to the Knights Templar, the barony of Maryculter which comprised of 8,000 acres.

It is said Alexander I – II & III along with Robert I & II, James I – III & IV went on to increase Templar Estates from the Royal Exchequer.

When the Templars were outlawed, their lands and buildings were supposed to pass into Hospitalliers hands, whose Scottish seat was at Torphichen in West Lothian.  The Pope’s orders were seldom followed, as was the case here, and it continued to be the parish church for local inhabitants.  As the years and centuries passed by the ‘Chapel of Balantrodoch,’ fell into dis-repair.

To the west of the village, in the valley of South Esk by the River Esk stands the ruined church of Balantrodoch with remnants of Gothic tracery and animals above the windows.  The original church had a round nave, like many Templar churches, a look alike of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem.  The church roof has long since gone… with some walls still remaining.  The west end was the entrance to the church, with the altar at the east end, with old niches carved into the walls, where once would have housed tombs, but these are long gone now.  Gravestones in the old graveyard bearing the symbols of carved skull and crossbones, one associated with death and the Knights Templar.  Others like the trowel and egg timer, we associate with the Freemasons along with the classic symbol of the compass and set square.

images

To the east of the village, stands the remains of the preceptory arch, out amongst the fields.  This being the original entrance to the Templars Manor House.

One event which involved William a preceptor and Templar of Ballentrodoch and his wife Christiane of Esperston.

William gifted the family home to the Templar Order in return for renting the said property, thus creating a life without financial hardships.

William suddenly died, his wife Christiane was penniless, and now the family home belonged to the Templar Order.  Which led to a Templar preceptor casting poor Christiane and her children from the former family home.  As she clutched at the door, her fingers were cut off by a sword at the hands of a Templar.

A distraught and homeless Christiane went to Newbattle Abbey where Edward I was staying and pleaded her case to him, and he so ordered her property be returned to her.  Not long after, war broke out and she found herself evicted once again. Richard her son, pleaded her case to Brian de Jay of the Templar Order.  Her property was once again returned to her, in return for her son acting as a guide for Welsh troops under the command of Brian de Jay.  It was nothing more than a trap, for Richard was murdered by Welsh troops by order of Brian de Jay.

At the Templar Trials, Brian de Jay was accused of acts of heresy, even though he could not answer the charges, having been killed at the ‘Battle of Falkirk.’  One Thomas Tocci de Thoroldeby claimed he had referred to Christ as being a mere man, and not a God.

Wikipedia Images:
Balantrodoch Chapel
Preceptory Arch

Sources:
In Search of the Knights Templar by Simon Brighton.

Scotland’s Freemasonry

william_st_clair_of_roslin2

William St.Clair

Scottish Freemasonry started with the building of Rosslyn Chapel to the south of Edinburgh.

The Evidence:

  • Rosslyn has links to the Jewish Temple through the Knights Templar and Freemasonry.
  • If one looks at the ground plan of Rosslyn Chapel, it is a copy of Herod’s Temple in Jerusalem.
  • Within Rosslyn Chapel, there exists a stone document showing a First Degree Ceremony conducted by a Knights Templar.

Carvings within Rosslyn Chapel, were cut first from wood, await inspection by the Master of the Works, then cut in stone.

The lower window located in the chapel’s south-west corner, depicts a Freemasonic First Degree.  The figure shown be of a blind man kneeling between two pillars, with a noose around his neck, and a bible in his left hand.  The rope is held by another wearing the mantle of a Knights Templar.

The Seven Points… A Masonic Ceremony:

  • The man be blindfolded, an unusual form of blind justice.
  • The man kneels down.
  • The man holds a bible, many other figures holding books or scrolls can be found in Rosslyn Chapel.
  • The man has a noose about his neck, the only other figure within the chapel with a noose, is the angel Shemhazai wearing one about his feet.The sins of Shemhazai, caused God to send in the flood.  Shemhazai unable to face God hung himself between heaven and earth.
  • The man placed his feet in the posture used by Masonic candidates.
  • The ceremony takes place between two pillars of Masonic Lodge.
  • The noose being held by a knights Templar.

In 1440 William St. Clair renowned as one of the most powerful men in Scotland.

The building of Rosslyn Chapel was to house the treasures he had inherited from the Templars and establish a seat of spiritual authority to rival King James II who was dabbling in English politics and killed during the War of the Roses.

Formation of the Grand Lodge of Scotland:

1440 Masons given the Mason word by William to preserve the secret of the Templars.

1483 Masonry is starting to spread out as lodges initiate Candidates and give the ‘Mason Word.’

1599 Earliest surviving lodge just minutes from Edinburgh.

1601 James VI made a Mason at Lodge of Scoon and Perth.

1602 William Schaw sets up the modern lodge system in Scotland upon the instructions of James VI.

The Lodges of Scotland affirm William St. Clair of Roslin as hereditary Grand Master Mason of Scotland.

1603 James VI takes Freemasonry to England where he becomes King James I of England.

1641 Sir Robert Moray becomes the first Mason recorded to be born on English soil.

1715 First Jacobite Rising, lodges begin to disclaim their Scottish roots.

1717 Formation of Grand Lodge of London denies Jacobite heritage.

1725 First National Grand Lodge formed in Ireland.

1736 Grand Lodge of Scotland formed as a counter measure to London’s expansion.

William St. Clair of Roslin made First Grand Master Mason of Scotland and signs away his hereditary rights in favour of elected officers.

f87b1aeb99841090355b9505b87b9b9f

 

Scottish Templar: Bonnie Prince Charlie

NPG 5517; Prince Charles Edward Stuart by Louis Gabriel Blanchet

Bonnie Prince Charlie was born on the 31stDecember 1720 to James III of Scotland, in Rome, amidst great rejoicing, for Jacobites throughout Western Europe who looked to him to win back the throne for the Stuarts.

Europe became increasingly restless when Emperor Charles VI died in 1740. And tension mounted between Protestant England and Catholic Jacobean Scotland and France.  Charles’ ambition and desire for military success led him to plan an invasion of England, in order to capture the throne for his father, from George II.

After a brief period in France following a failed attempt to gain support, Prince Charles landed in Scotland on the 25thJuly 1745.  He quickly gained support from the highlands, and his army successfully fought General John Cape’s men.  The Battle of Prestonpans was fought on the 21stSeptember 1745, near the town of Prestonpans, a small fishing community in East Lothian.  It was the first major battle of the 1745 Jacobite Rising, an attempt by Bonnie Prince Charlie (Charles Edward Stuart) to seize the English throne.

On the 24thSeptember 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie (Charles Edward Stuart) was elected the new Grand Master of the Scottish Knights Templar in Edinburgh.

With victory in their hearts and a strong sword at hand, victorious warriors of the Battle of Prestonpans. Charles and his army started their long road to London.  They were forced to retreat back to Scotland, after receiving reports of overwhelming armies prepared to defend the city.  Much against the Prince’s will, his supporters turned back at Derby.  Pursued by government forces, they won a victory at Falkirk but were finally crushed at the Battle of Culloden in 1746.

Charles was forced to spend the next five months as a hunted man, finally escaping Scotland through the Western Highlands to France, spending the rest of his life in exile, sinking ever deeper into depression and alcoholism.  His late marriage in 1772 to the German Louise of Stalberg was childless, and she eventually left him.

After his father’s death, he styled himself in the image of Charles III, but by then all hope of a Jacobite restoration was lost.  He died on the 31stJanuary 1788.

Knights Templar: “Rex Deus” Treasure

Holy Land

Jewish elders feared, a Roman invasion led by Titus, would plunder the Holy Land, and seize their priceless treasure which included the Essene and Cabalistic scrolls.

maxresdefault

How right they were for, for Roman General and later Emperor, Titus son of Emperor Vespasian, campaigned in Judea, where he besieged and almost destroyed Jerusalem in 70AD.

These Jewish elders hid their treasure, and fled to Europe, where many married into noble families.  Twenty-four became patriarchs, known as the “Rex Deus” families.

Hundreds of years passed by, and the secret location of the Jewish treasure, was passed down through the families, until the First Crusade.  Knighted members of the “Rex Deus” joined holy warriors, with a dual purpose, defeating Moslems and recovering family treasure.

The original knights of the nine Knights Templar were either born or related to the Rex Deus families.  Godfrey de Boullion was one of these and a French General, who led his forces against the Saracens during the First Crusade.  King Baldwin II of Jerusalem cousin to Godfrey de Boullion, played his part in the retrieval of their family treasure, by granting the Al-Aqsa Mosque, to be used by the Knights Templar.

Information handed down, through the centuries, led the knights to the family treasure, buried under what was Solomon’s stables.  It took nine years to excavate four large trunks of treasure and scrolls.

51C6ba4G3SL

Heavenly Jerusalem Print

With the death of King Baldwin II, the knights left the Holy Land, bound for Europe.  They stopped off at St.Omer in Flanders, where the document known as the “Heavenly Jerusalem” was copied, and can now be found at the University of Ghent’s Library in Belgium.

Following a special ceremony taken by Pope Honorius III at the Council of Troyes in 1128.  Hughes de Payen and Andre de Montbard, delivered the four trunks of treasure to Kilwinning in Scotland, home of the Grand Lodge of Freemasonry.

The four trunks of treasure resided at Kilwinning for many years before being moved to Rosslyn Castle, near Edinburgh, home of the Sinclairs.  The Sinclairs were one of the “Rex Deus” families, and legend has it, they became entwined with the Knights Templar when Catherine de Saint Clair married Hughes de Payen, before he took the vows of a monk in 1128.  With a Sinclair Templar bond, one can understand why much knights, treasure ended up in Scotland, and when they fled France in 1307, more treasure made its way to Scotland, and into the coffers of the Sinclair clan.

Rosslyn Chapel

Rosslyn Chapel

When fire broke out at Rosslyn Castle, four trunks of Templar Treasure was moved to Rosslyn Chapel, which was under construction.  One has to ask, was Rosslyn Chapel its planned destination?

Historical information tells us, four large trunks from the Holy Land, have made their way into a vault within the chapel’s crypt.

Rosslyn Chapel’s construction is a copy of Solomon’s Temple.  As such, these trunks have been placed in a copy building which resembles Solomon’s Temple.

Knights Templar: Switzerland

switzerland-map

Is there any connection between Knights Templar and Switzerland?

The “Old Swiss Confederation” was born on the 1st August 1291.

In 1280, the French Monarchy was in conflict with the Templar’s, so it was inevitable issues would come to a head.

The Templar’s headquarters in the city of Troyes in France was lost, when the region had come under the control of the French Crown.

The Templars must have got wind, of possible actions being put in place by King Philip IV of France.  Twenty-four hours before the arrest of Jacques de Molay on the 13th October 1307, a fleet of Templar ships sailed from the French port of La Rochelle, laden with treasure and knights.

Knight Templar Ships

Templar Fleet

The French Monarchy, who had expected to confiscate Templar treasure, found empty store houses… it had sailed away from France under the cover of darkness, destination unknown.

When the order went out by the Pope, that all Templar knights were to be arrested.  Thousands were rounded up and arrested on charges of heresy and burnt at the stake, whilst other’s dispersed across Europe, seeking sanctuary.  Some escaped to Spain, joining up with the Caltrava and Alcantra, some moved to Portugal and took on a new name; the Order of Christ.  Others joined the Teutonic knights of Germany, and some joined the Hospitallers, the stepping stone to the Knights of Malta.

knights-templar-2a

Knights Templar

Some Templar knights landed in Scotland and were granted sanctuary by Robert the Bruce.  These knights took up arms and joined Robert the Bruce in his fight against the English, for Scotland’s Independence.  Rosslyn Chapel, home of the Sinclair knights, members of the Templar order.  These warriors were buried along with their treasure in the crypt of the chapel.

With Switzerland located over the border to the east of France.  Hundreds of Knights Templar would have easily slipped across the border with their treasures, into this newly formed country.

The main income of Switzerland was farming… it was a poor country, ripe for a takeover.

In 1315, Duke Leopold of Habsburg attacked several hundred men with his force of 2,000 knights and 9,000 foot soldiers… expecting little resistance.

He was in for a surprise, as the Swiss possessed a new weapon, the “Halberd” which was mounted on a long pole, capable of bringing down horses and used like a lance.  Leopold lost almost 2,000 warriors that day, and was forced to retreat.

halbard-switzerland

Halberd

Therefore in my opinion a primitive farming country had received outside assistance, enabling them to protect their lands from invading warriors.

The only answer that made sense, Templar Knights had escaped from France, crossed the border into Switzerland and granted sanctuary, bringing with them their military expertise and Templar treasure… buying their way into this new country.

The Templar’s were Europe’s bankers from the 11th – 14th century, now the largest banking and financial institutions of Europe are located in Switzerland.

Pope Julius II called upon Helvetian soldiers in 1506, these mercenaries who would shape Italy’s future, and were granted the title “Defenders of the Church’s Freedom.”

On the 22nd January 1506, one hundred and ninety-nine years after the arrest of Jacques de Molay in France, the Vatican created the Pontifical Swiss Guard.

swiss-guard-vatican

The Vatican’s Swiss Guard

One hundred and fifty Swiss soldiers under the command of Captain Kasparvon Silenen of Canton Uri, passed through the Vatican and were blessed by Pope Julius II.

switzerland-flag

Flag of Switzerland

The famous cross associated with the Knights Templar, is incorporated into the flag of Switzerland.

Wikipedia Images